Restoration of the tiled stoves of the palace

In 1995, while preparing to repair the roofs of the Episcopal Palace, a large number of tiled stoves were discovered in the building’s attic. The majority of them were remnants of Classicist tiled stoves from the first third of the 19th century. We discovered fragments of a four-meter-high gilded Baroque tiled stove, which may have once heated the banquet hall in the façade wing.                        

The remnants of the tiled stoves found in the attic

 

The Baroque tiled stove and the columned Classicist tiled stove have been reconstructed from a fragment of several cockelstoves discovered in the attic during the palace’s current renovation phase, and five cylindrical cocklestoves have been restored in their original location.

Baroque tiled stove

Main cornice, the eight-sectioned top with voluted corner pillars

dome

 

Ledge, base decorated with a medallion, plinth

Restoration of a Classicist Swedish tiled stove (Kakelugn)

 

 

The only stove of the collection, which stood on a square pedestal rather than a cylindrical one and was decorated with columns and capitals, emerged from the attic in very poor condition. The gaps were filled with plaster after cleaning, sorting, and gluing, and the replacement parts were painted the same colour as the original glaze.

Photograph of the cylindrical tiled stoves in their original place before and after restoration.

 

Judit Szebényi – silicate restorer

László Soós – applied artist restorer

09 May 2021, Budapest

 

In 1995, while preparing to repair the roofs of the Episcopal Palace, a large number of tiled stoves were discovered in the building’s attic. The majority of them were remnants of Classicist tiled stoves from the first third of the 19th century. We discovered fragments of a four-meter-high gilded Baroque tiled stove, which may have once heated the banquet hall in the façade wing. The Baroque tiled stove and the columned Classicist tiled stove have been reconstructed from a fragment of several cocklestoves discovered in the attic during the palace’s current renovation phase, and five cylindrical cocklestoves have been restored in their original location.